The 100 Day Project: 2017

It’s that time of year again. The 100 Day project is upon us and I’m participating for my 3rd time.

This year my 100 Day Project is lettering the “radio”. The radio is information. I grew up listening to public radio and now also listen to tons of podcasts. The radio has always been my main source of news and helped me to be a critical thinker. So as I letter I’ll be sharing tidbits of ideas and things I hear good ol’ fashioned public radio and the modern version of the radio, podcasts.

I’ve love using the tools for calligraphy and brush lettering but sometimes I’m at a loss for what to write. This project provides me a solution to that for the next 100 days. Here we go!

Info to join in the fun can be found at the official website.

Follow along with my project on Instagram #LetteringTheRadio

My past two projects.
2015 #100DaysOfDayBreakPlay
Related blog post

2016 #100OnionDrops
Related blog post

A pop of green

I remember a magical moment; waking up to find green footprints leading me into the bathroom where a large dinosaur formerly known as a brontosaurus sat in the tub, inflatable and green. It was St. Patrick's day and I was six and a half.

I think I love holidays because they all come with a little dose of magic. What's more magical than finding gold at the end of the rainbow? Perhaps these things seem so much more magical as a child because we don't know how the mechanics of the world work yet. Either way we try right? We dye scrambled eggs, rivers, and beer green for one day a year. So I ask you... why not popcorn?!

This is an easy little DIY to create some green magic and a pretty healthy snack.

Supplies
— Popcorn, popped in an air popper or plain microwavable
— Green food coloring
— About 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
— Clean spray bottle previously used only for water or food purposes
— Optional seasonings of salt, dill, OR seaweed 

Instructions

  1. Poor olive oil into the spray bottle and add about 8 drops of food color. 
  2. Shake vigorously. Test that it squirts out of the bottle. It will likely only squirt not mist.
  3. As your popcorn pops into your bowl spray with green oil. Or squirt on after for microwave popped.
  4. Add additional seasonings of your choice. I recommend dill or seaweed seasoning for even more green!

(Be aware that when you use a lot of food coloring you can sometimes taste it. I recommend adding enough to create some pops of green instead of trying to douse every kernel in color).

An Easter Update
You can also use this green popcorn to make an Easter egg hunt snack. Use the green popcorn as grass and then hide candy eggs inside. 

I Weave You

Today I'm sharing my first little loom weavings as I've started to explore this craft. I bought myself a loom for Christmas at the West Coast Craft Fair from Meghan Shimek. She has a beginner's kit that includes, loom, yarn, and an instruction book for making a sampler weaving. The sampler is a good tutorial for learning basic techniques and how to merge different kinds of yarn within a weaving.

I had been wanting to take a beginning class for awhile so decided to just go the kit route. I was also given a little tutorial when I purchased my loom. It was very helpful along with hunting down some good blog posts and youtube tutorials on the subject.

  This heart weaving is the first project I've planned out. I wanted to use only yarns I already owned. With a little help from a friend I decided to make it a fuzzy heart using wool roving.

This heart weaving is the first project I've planned out. I wanted to use only yarns I already owned. With a little help from a friend I decided to make it a fuzzy heart using wool roving.

  My first weaving made with the  Meghan Shimek kit.

My first weaving made with the Meghan Shimek kit.

  This was my second little weaving and I was exploring fibers I already owned.

This was my second little weaving and I was exploring fibers I already owned.

In the past when I've gone to the yarn store to get wool roving for needle felting projects I've always had to avert my eyes from all the wonderful looking yarns. If I bought them they would have just waited for a future project or a future where I suddenly enjoy knitting. Unlike knitting I do indeed weave it!

Boro Stitch

If I've calculated correctly I've had this textile for 13+ years. It's a block printed textile from India. I've been hard on it. It's been used as my bedspread. The sun has faded it in areas. My cat put lot's of holes in it as a kitten learning how to jump and retract his claws. It's almost used up but I wanted to get a little more life out of it.

I decided to make it my first Boro stitch project. I shared about Boro a little in my Sashiko stitch post. Boro is a Japanese mending stitch and oh did this need some mending. At first I thought I was fixing a couple large holes...

  My first mendings on the piece are in the center and upper left of this image.

My first mendings on the piece are in the center and upper left of this image.

BorroMending_6528.gif

But nope, tons of little holes from the years of use. In some areas this fabric is basically thread bare. It turned into the perfect project to explore this visible mending technique. My plan was to hang this as a shower curtain when I'd finished so I knew it would be forgiving to my novice skill level.

To mend something it's necessary to back the hole with a piece of fabric larger than the hole.

  To tie off my thread I connected my back stitches securing my ends.

To tie off my thread I connected my back stitches securing my ends.

  The back of my textile is very messy with these little scraps of cloth but in use they won't be seen.

The back of my textile is very messy with these little scraps of cloth but in use they won't be seen.

  Perhaps my favorite little mend.

Perhaps my favorite little mend.

  Mending, mending, mending...

Mending, mending, mending...

It ended up being a much larger project than I expected so I working on it every day for about 10 days. Sometimes for a couple hours, sometimes for 5 minutes. If you're trying this out for the first time I do recommend starting out with your smallest hole first before tackling the larger ones. I wish I had done that myself.

BorroMend_6537.jpg

Now it hangs in my bathroom totally transforming the tiny space! Because it's not backlit the mending scraps don't stand out just the boro stitches themselves.

Silent ribbon rattles: An easy DIY gift

Over the last couple years many new babies have come into my life. I've been making them these silent ribbon rattles. I use fun colors and intersperse black because babies visual senses are stimulated by high contrast colors.

With the long Thanksgiving holiday ahead of us I wanted to share this easy DIY in case you wanted to start crafting some holiday gifts. It's simple to make a bunch of these at the same time. You can get as fancy or as simple with your ribbon choices. Most fabric stores sell basic ribbon by the yard at a very reasonable price.

These can be a great gift on their own or work great as a gift topper. Because they're made of fabric they're also easy to wash. And with all the noisy baby gadgets out there I'm sure the silence is appreciated.

I wrapped one rattle in an exposed way so it was both decorative while being the actual contents of the gift.

Materials

– 6 yards of ribbon (variety of colors and widths. (I typically don't use ribbon wider than 5/8ths inch.)
– 1.5 inch D ring (Usually sold in multiples of 2)
– Scissors

Make It

— Prep your materials by cutting about 15 lengths of ribbon 15 inches each in length.
— Fold one length of ribbon in half to create a loop and secure to the D ring with a lanyard hitch knot. Then tie an overhand knot to finish securing the ribbon.
— Repeat until your D ring is packed with ribbons. I vary the colors as I go and intersperse with black ribbons.

A little side note. I am wowed by all the knot possibilities out there. There is most likely even a more secure method for tying these ribbons so feel free to experiment!